Gut Bacteria Linked to Parkinson’s Disease

stomachDon’t overlook the bacteria in our gut. They can be very telling about our health.

Finnish scientists found that Parkinson’s disease sufferers have a different microbiota in their intestines than their healthy counterparts.

“Our most important observation was that patients with Parkinson’s have much less bacteria from the Prevotellaceae family; unlike the control group, practically no one in the patient group had a large quantity of bacteria from this family,” said Filip Scheperjans, neurologist at the University of Helsinki Continue reading

 

Energy Saving Homes Linked to Asthma: UK Study

work deskAs people are more and more environment conscious, energy efficient homes has become a trend in home building to keep costs low and reduce the carbon footprints.

However, research by the University of Exeter Medical School indicated that the drive for energy efficient homes could increase asthma risks. Continue reading

 

Vital Exhaustion Affects Heart Health: Mount Sinai Study

tideAre you easily tired, irritable and feeling blue?

Researchers from Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai Roosevelt hospitals found that fatigue, increased irritability and demoralization, also known as vital exhaustion, may raise the risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36 percent. Continue reading

 

The Gut Microbiome and the Brain

Leo GallandMicrobiome stories fill the news. The impact of intestinal microbes on health and disease is widely considered a breakthrough area for scientific research.

But what does it mean for you?

Dr. Leo Galland’s groundbreaking  new article reveals how the millions of microbes in your gut may influence what is going on in your head.
Continue reading

 

Vitamin C Improves Respiratory Symptoms after Exercise

exerciseAntioxidant Vitamin C has been shown to cut oxidative stress from people engaging in vigorous exercise.  Latest research indicates that it actually improves respiratory symptoms for people after exercise.

In several studies, vitamin C administration reduces oxidative stress markers caused by exercise.  Vitamin C is also involved in the metabolism of histamine, prostaglandins, and cysteinyl leukotrienes, all of which appear to be mediators in the pathogenesis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Continue reading

 

Resveratrol Anti-Inflammatory in Cardiovascular Diseases

Photo Credit Sirui Ma

Photo Credit Sirui Ma

Why the French tend to less frequently develop cardiac diseases than Germans, despite the fact that they eat more fatty foods?

This so-called French Paradox has been attributed to the higher consumption of red wine in France and it has been the subject of various studies in the past. Continue reading